Treatment of varicose veins (varicer)

Treatment of varicose veins (varicer)
Varicose veins and spiderveins are a disease of the blood vessels. The disease is most common in women but does also affect men. Veins are blood vessels that lead blood back to the heart. Veins are superficial (in the subcutaneous fat) and also deeper (in the musculature). Between these there are connectors, so called perforators. The surface veins on the inside of the leg, known as vena.saphena magna, which run from the inner ankle bone to the groin, are generally involved in the varicose vein hernia disease.
A few patients with variose veins have issues with the surface veins on the back of the leg (vena.saphena parva).
Symptoms of varicose veins
The symptoms for varicose veins are usually presented by swelling, heaviness and cramp like pain. Some varicose veins are merely cosmetically displeasing. Varicose veins do not disappear without treatment. Sometimes it is possible to get a harmless surface blood clot in the winding blood vessels.
Varicose veins are not dangerous. If one is troubled then they almost completely disappear after surgery. The most effective and well tried procedure for treating surface vessels on the legs is to inject them with a solution that causes the vessels to shrivel, known as sclerosing.
Causes of varicose veins
The cause of varicose veins is unknown. The valve on the inside of the vein no longer seals tight, which results in the blood not being transported, causing gradual expansion of the vein. Varicose veins are mainly visible when one stands up and look like a winding, sack like, bluish chord.
Many women get varicose veins during pregnancy. Some but not all of these can return to normal after delivery. Hereditariness and work that requires sitting or standing for long periods can also play a part. Varicose veins can also occur in conjunction with thrombosis.
Treatment of varicose veins
The vessels of varicose veins to not contribute considerably to the legs blood circulation. Up to 80% of all blood transportation from the leg occurs in the deeper, inner veins. These are not affected by varicose vein surgery.
If one has previously undergone surgery of the groin and the recurrence is located in the same area, it will most likely be necessary to undergo another surgery. Even if the result of the surgery in the groin is not visible, it increases the risk for recurrences. If you have previously been treated at this level, the surgeon should be a vascular surgeon. All surgeons at Art Clinic that work with varicose veins are vascular surgeons.
Before varicose vein surgery
The surgeries are generally performed under general anaesthetic, but lesser problems can be treated with local anaesthetic.
The vessels of varicose veins to not contribute considerably to the legs blood circulation. There is a large amount of reserve vessels in the superficial system. Up to 80% of all blood transportation from the leg occurs in the deeper, inner veins. These are not affected by varicose vein surgery.
Surgical procedure – varicose veins
Surgery on the main stem (vena saphena magna and vena saphena parva) involves inserting a plastic thread into one end of the vessel and out the other side. The vessel is removed using the plastic thread. Removal of smaller varicose veins outside of the main stems is performed using small incisions (approx. 3-8mm). Cutting off connecting veins (perforators) may require larger incisions.
Possible complications of varicose vein surgery
Varicose veins contain blood therefore it is almost impossible to avoid some blood being left in the subcutaneous fat. This generally appears as bruising and disappears without remaining problems.
Wound infections are rare after varicose vein surgery. In connection with the main stems there are nerves that, within a limited area, operate the skins sense of feeling. These can be affected by surgery.
After varicose vein surgery
During the first two days after the surgery it is worth keeping your legs high when seated, for instance by putting them up on a chair. After a few days you are able to move around as much as you are capable of. Sutures will be removed after approximately one week and until then the leg is to be constantly bandaged. Once the sutures are removed it is sufficient to only bandage the lower leg during the day. The bandage is to be used as long as there is a tendency to swell. This period varies, at times it is enough with one more week, but four to six weeks after surgery is not uncommon.
Sick leave varies between one to two weeks.

Offers